Interrupted Aortic Arch
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Interrupted Aortic Arch (rollover image) Interrupted Aortic Arch and the Adult Patient

Repair of interrupted aortic arch occurs in the neonatal period. In most cases, the outlook after repair of interrupted aortic arch is excellent. No unusual restrictions to activity or lifestyle will usually apply. However, as interrupted aortic arch usually occurs with other cardiac anomalies, the long-term follow-up and treatment will be affected by their presence.

Reoperation will occasionally be necessary because of new or recurring problems after surgery. For example, stenosis (narrowing) may develop in the aortic arch near the site of repair or in the left ventricular outflow tract within the heart (in or near the aortic valve). Also, there may be the persistence or development of ventricular septal defects requiring closure. This may often be accomplished through a cardiac catheterization procedure.

Lifelong medication will be required for the IAA patient after surgery to guard against infective endocarditis - the inflammation of the heart's interior lining and/or valves.